Homes or gardens?

Vacant lots dot lower-income neighborhoods across the country. In many cities, urban growers have planted in those lots, repurposing abandoned city land into gardens with farmers markets and healthy food. But cities often still register such plots as “vacant,” which allows them to be snatched up by housing developers. In communities where both housing and… » Read More

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$40 million later, a pioneering plan to boost wild fish stocks shows little success

Back in 1983, it seemed like a good idea. Local populations of California white seabass, prized by recreational and commercial fishermen for its mild, flaky white flesh, were declining. While a fishery management plan didn’t exist back then, sport fishermen had noticed a decline in their catches and asked officials for help. State lawmakers then… » Read More

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Was your seafood caught with slave labor? New tool tries to help retailers.

The Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch program, known best for its red, yellow, and green sustainable seafood-rating scheme, is unveiling its first Seafood Slavery Risk Tool today. It’s a database designed to help corporate seafood buyers assess the risk of forced labor, human trafficking, and hazardous child labor in the seafood they purchase. The tool’s release… » Read More

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‘Healing through harvesting’: Gleaning unwanted fruit helps refugees in need

Tilahun Liben thought he was seeing things. Surely that mound of orange orbs under those trees near his church couldn’t be oranges. Could they? More on this story Read more of our reporting on nutrition and food access.  Read more of our reporting on farms and labor.  It was 2010, and Liben had just arrived… » Read More

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Do you care if your fish dinner was raised humanely? Animal advocates say you should.

At some point or another, we’ve all cringed at the videos: lame cows struggling to stand; egg-laying hens squeezed into small, stacked cages; hogs confined to gestation crates, unable to walk or turn. More on this story Read more of our reporting on oceans and freshwater Over the last decade, animal advocates have made great… » Read More

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How a wild berry is helping to protect China’s Giant Pandas and its countryside

In the cool mountains of the Upper Yangtze region, Chinese villagers clamber up dogwood and maple trees to gather what Dr. Oz has called a “miracle anti-aging pill.” The small, red schisandra berry has a peculiar taste — five tastes, in fact, because it’s considered to be at once sweet, sour, salty, bitter and pungent.… » Read More

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Bears Ears Monument Is A Win For Tribal Food Sovereignty. Will Trump Undo It?

Seven years ago, the Navajo tribal council in southeastern Utah started mapping the secret sites where medicine men and women forage for healing plants and native people source wild foods. They wanted to make a case for protecting the landscape known as Bears Ears, a place not only sacred to their tribe, but to many other… » Read More

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