Is the United States ready for offshore aquaculture?

Aquaculture

Harlon Pearce walks muck-booted past processors gutting wild drum and red snapper to showcase a half-full new 5,000-square-foot (500-square-meter) freezer he hopes will someday house a fresh boom of marine fish. Harlon’s LA Fish sits just across the railroad tracks from the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, perfectly positioned to ship fish out of… » Read More

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The deliciously fishy case of The Codfather

The fake Russians met the Codfather on June 3, 2015, at an inconspicuous warehouse on South Front Street in New Bedford, Massachusetts. The Codfather’s lair is a green and white building with a peaked roof, fishing gear strewn across a fenced-in backyard, and the words “Carlos Seafood” stamped above the door. The distant gray line… » Read More

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Revenge of the lunch lady

In the fall of 2009, the British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver arrived in Huntington, West Virginia, which had recently been named the unhealthiest city in America. Huntingtonians were suffering in record numbers from diabetes and heart disease. They were being destroyed by the mountains of burgers and fries and nuggets that filled their restaurants, schools,… » Read More

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Farmers behind barbed-wire fences: 75 years later, Japanese-Americans remember incarceration during World War Two

When President Trump signed an executive order last month banning people from seven Muslim countries from entering the U.S., and advocated a Muslim registry, some of the loudest opponents were Japanese-Americans. They have long memories of another executive order, No. 9066, that forced all Japanese-Americans on the West Coast from their homes and businesses during… » Read More

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Reclaiming native ground: Can Louisiana’s tribes restore their traditional diets as waters rise?

When Theresa Dardar was growing up in Houma, her mother used to take her to visit relatives in the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe community. They would drive 20 miles toward the Gulf of Mexico, park at the local grocery store, and ask someone to ferry them across the bayou. From there, they’d walk across land thick… » Read More

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Bears Ears Monument Is A Win For Tribal Food Sovereignty. Will Trump Undo It?

Seven years ago, the Navajo tribal council in southeastern Utah started mapping the secret sites where medicine men and women forage for healing plants and native people source wild foods. They wanted to make a case for protecting the landscape known as Bears Ears, a place not only sacred to their tribe, but to many other… » Read More

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    NPR's The Salt