African Americans have lost untold acres of farmland over the last century

Driving the long, flat roads of Hilton Head island is hypnotic. One bike-rental shop blends into another; countless villa-style office complexes advertise real-estate agents and banks. Tourists meander to their cars wearing all white, carrying brightly colored smoothies. Rows of palm trees wave slowly over the crawling traffic. A waterfront hotel looms on the horizon.… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 1.3 Million Monthly Readership
    The Nation

Terror in the Heartland

On October 11, 2016, less than a month before Election Day, police in Liberal, Kansas, sat in their cruisers outside G&G Home Center, waiting for Curtis Allen to emerge. The mobile home dealership where Allen worked was nothing more than a prefab trailer hauled onto a patch of scrub grass along a remote stretch of… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 4.7 Million Monthly Reach
    The New Republic

Bears Ears Monument Is A Win For Tribal Food Sovereignty. Will Trump Undo It?

Seven years ago, the Navajo tribal council in southeastern Utah started mapping the secret sites where medicine men and women forage for healing plants and native people source wild foods. They wanted to make a case for protecting the landscape known as Bears Ears, a place not only sacred to their tribe, but to many other… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 4 Million Monthly Reach
    NPR's The Salt

How a wild berry is helping to protect China’s Giant Pandas and its countryside

In the cool mountains of the Upper Yangtze region, Chinese villagers clamber up dogwood and maple trees to gather what Dr. Oz has called a “miracle anti-aging pill.” The small, red schisandra berry has a peculiar taste — five tastes, in fact, because it’s considered to be at once sweet, sour, salty, bitter and pungent.… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 4 Million Monthly Reach
    NPR's The Salt

Is the United States ready for offshore aquaculture?

Aquaculture

Harlon Pearce walks muck-booted past processors gutting wild drum and red snapper to showcase a half-full new 5,000-square-foot (500-square-meter) freezer he hopes will someday house a fresh boom of marine fish. Harlon’s LA Fish sits just across the railroad tracks from the Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport, perfectly positioned to ship fish out of… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 3 Million Monthly Reach
    Ensia