Climate change threatens Montana’s barley farmers – and possibly your beer

The heat last summer in Montana was brutal and unprecedented. Dry winds fanned wildfires across one million acres, ravaging grasslands in the eastern part of the state and scorching the timbered mountains west of the continental divide. In the tiny town of Power, which sits in the foothills of the Rockies, smack in the middle… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • The Weather Channel
    More than 80 million unique users a month

An unlikely climate crusade in Trump country

It was a quarter after eight on a steamy August morning when Rachel Grantham rumbled up in a big black pickup truck. The 26-year-old, six-foot-three agronomist sported a pink top, a purple miniskirt, camouflage muck boots and a single blonde braid draped over one shoulder. I hoisted myself into the cab of the truck, and we… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • The WorldPost
    More than 1 million audience reach

Can New Mexico’s ancient irrigation canals survive a changing climate?

Water murmurs and flows through a narrow earthen canal that winds along the cottonwood-lined edge of Santa Cruz Farm. Located in the tiny burg of Santa Cruz de la Cañada in northern New Mexico, the farm produces prolifically, despite being just three and a half acres. The owner, 63-year-old Don Bustos, grows tender salad greens,… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • More than 80 million unique visitors a month
    The Weather Channel

Uprooting FDR’s ‘Great Wall of Trees’

Surely the end was nigh. Up and down the Great Plains, from the Texas panhandle to the Dakota prairies, dust stripped the paint from their barns, the wheat from their fields, the money — what pitiful amount was left — from their pockets. “Today is just common hell, death and destruction to every growing thing,”… » Read More

Media Partner

How heat kills farmworkers

On a recent summer morning in Mendota, a small farming community in California’s Central Valley, the sun glared down from a cloudless sky. The temperature was heading toward 101 degrees, and it had hit 106 a few days before—not unlike the blistering heat that blanketed much of the West Coast over Labor Day weekend. While… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 8 MILLION MONTHLY READERSHIP
    Mother Jones

Reclaiming native ground: Can Louisiana’s tribes restore their traditional diets as waters rise?

When Theresa Dardar was growing up in Houma, her mother used to take her to visit relatives in the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe community. They would drive 20 miles toward the Gulf of Mexico, park at the local grocery store, and ask someone to ferry them across the bayou. From there, they’d walk across land thick… » Read More

Media Partner

This Kansas farmer fought a government program to keep his farm sustainable.

In 2012, Gail Fuller’s 2,000-acre farm was at ground zero for the drought that decimated corn production throughout the Midwest. His corn and soybeans had barely squeaked through the previous dry summer, even as many of his neighbors in Lyon County, Kansas, saw their crops desiccate and fail in the unrelenting sun. But when the… » Read More

Media Partner
This Story’s Impact
  • 3 Million Monthly Reach
    Ensia