Revenge of the lunch lady

In the fall of 2009, the British celebrity chef Jamie Oliver arrived in Huntington, West Virginia, which had recently been named the unhealthiest city in America. Huntingtonians were suffering in record numbers from diabetes and heart disease. They were being destroyed by the mountains of burgers and fries and nuggets that filled their restaurants, schools,… » Read More

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Reclaiming native ground: Can Louisiana’s tribes restore their traditional diets as waters rise?

When Theresa Dardar was growing up in Houma, her mother used to take her to visit relatives in the Pointe-au-Chien Indian Tribe community. They would drive 20 miles toward the Gulf of Mexico, park at the local grocery store, and ask someone to ferry them across the bayou. From there, they’d walk across land thick… » Read More

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Bears Ears Monument Is A Win For Tribal Food Sovereignty. Will Trump Undo It?

Seven years ago, the Navajo tribal council in southeastern Utah started mapping the secret sites where medicine men and women forage for healing plants and native people source wild foods. They wanted to make a case for protecting the landscape known as Bears Ears, a place not only sacred to their tribe, but to many other… » Read More

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    NPR's The Salt

Immigrant communities are on the front lines of the Bay Area’s soda-tax battle

This campaign season, an ad featuring Kaykay Amamgbo, the owner of Oakland’s African Caribbean Food Market, has gotten a lot of exposure. As images of smiling customers and bins heaped with ripe tomatoes roll, Amamgbo warns of a proposed tax that would raise food prices and hurt the community. “The last thing we need in… » Read More

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    PRI's The World

Slow food nation

Carlos Monteiro got his start in medicine in the 1970s as a pediatrician working in poor villages and slums in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. His patients were hungry, and it was written on their bodies: Many were anemic, underweight, and stunted. Today, Monteiro is a professor of nutrition at the University of São Paulo’s… » Read More

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    The Nation

Before steroids, Russians secretly studied herbs

Long before the Russians were caught doping their athletes with steroids, the former Soviet Union spent decades secretly searching for energy-enhancing plants that would help their Olympians, as well as their soldiers and astronauts, perform better. The Soviets were looking for what they called “adaptogens”—plant species that would encourage the body to adapt to physical… » Read More

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