The jamón went down to Georgia

Even from a distance, the pigs looked odd. It was hard to see them clearly at first; heavy rains had carved ruts into the dirt road that led into the pasture, and every time the Jeep hit bottom, my glasses slid down my nose. But as we jolted forward, the mass of dark bodies crowding… » Read More

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An unlikely climate crusade in Trump country

It was a quarter after eight on a steamy August morning when Rachel Grantham rumbled up in a big black pickup truck. The 26-year-old, six-foot-three agronomist sported a pink top, a purple miniskirt, camouflage muck boots and a single blonde braid draped over one shoulder. I hoisted myself into the cab of the truck, and we… » Read More

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Is ‘seed to table’ the next big food trend? One top chef hopes so.

Starting in the late fall and continuing through the winter, when gardens are dormant, the seed industry blossoms. Catalogues arrive filled with the latest collections of heirloom tomatoes, hot and sweet peppers, Asian greens, multicolored beans, even varieties from Italy. So when I heard about another seed company – launched by no less than star… » Read More

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    Washington Post

Climate change threatens Montana’s barley farmers – and possibly your beer

The heat last summer in Montana was brutal and unprecedented. Dry winds fanned wildfires across one million acres, ravaging grasslands in the eastern part of the state and scorching the timbered mountains west of the continental divide. In the tiny town of Power, which sits in the foothills of the Rockies, smack in the middle… » Read More

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The simple river-cleaning tactics that big farms ignore

Ione Cleverley wasn’t eager to break up with her tenant, who had been farming 88 acres of her central Iowa land for more than a decade. He was affable and hardworking, but after harvesting his corn and soybeans, the farmer left her fields unplanted. Cleverley had learned that each spring, as the soil warmed and… » Read More

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    National Geographic

Can New Mexico’s ancient irrigation canals survive a changing climate?

Water murmurs and flows through a narrow earthen canal that winds along the cottonwood-lined edge of Santa Cruz Farm. Located in the tiny burg of Santa Cruz de la Cañada in northern New Mexico, the farm produces prolifically, despite being just three and a half acres. The owner, 63-year-old Don Bustos, grows tender salad greens,… » Read More

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    The Weather Channel

Where corn is king, the stirrings of a renaissance in small grains

To the untrained eye, Jeremy Gustafson’s 1,600-acre farm looks like all the others spread out across Iowa. Gazing at his conventional corn and soybean fields during a visit in June, I was hard-pressed to say where his neighbor’s tightly planted row crops ended and Gustafson’s began. But what distinguished this vast farm in Boone, Iowa,… » Read More

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