Lisa Morehouse
Lisa Morehouse is a public radio reporter whose work has taken her from Samoan traveling circuses to Mississippi Delta classrooms. Her work can be heard on The California Report, The World and NPR’s Latino USA and Weekend Edition. For her series California Foodways, Morehouse is reporting county-by-county, exploring the intersections of food, culture, economics, history and labor. In addition to reporting, she teaches radio production to at-risk youth in the Bay Area.

Farmers behind barbed-wire fences: 75 years later, Japanese-Americans remember incarceration during World War Two

When President Trump signed an executive order last month banning people from seven Muslim countries from entering the U.S., and advocated a Muslim registry, some of the loudest opponents were Japanese-Americans. They have long memories of another executive order, No. 9066, that forced all Japanese-Americans on the West Coast from their homes and businesses during… » Read More

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Preserving Gold Rush-era Heritage Trees With Amigo Bob Cantisano

Who doesn’t like a treasure hunt? The search for something mysterious and valuable, with just a few clues for guidance, is pretty irresistible. In California’s Nevada County, an unusual explorer with an unusual name — Amigo Bob Cantisano — hunts for remnants of the Gold Rush, just not the kind you might expect. More on… » Read More

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  • 330,000 listeners per episode
    KQED California Report

The Forgotten Filipino-Americans Who Led the ’65 Delano Grape Strike

Today, grapes in the grocery store don’t seem that controversial. But 50 years ago, a historic strike in California’s Central Valley vineyards set in motion the most significant campaign in modern labor history: the farmworker movement. More on this story Read a short summary of this story. Read more of our reporting on farms &… » Read More

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Borderlands Food Bank: Cutting Food Waste at The Border

Just across the border from Nogales, Ariz., rows of north-bound trucks line up for inspection. Over half of the produce that’s grown in Mexico and imported — $4 billion worth — comes through this border crossing. Most gets distributed to all parts of the U.S. and Canada, but some fruits and vegetables get rejected before… » Read More

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This Story’s Impact
  • 330,000 listeners per episode
    LatinoUSA