Can kelp be the biofuel of the future?

Researchers at the University of Southern California are in the early stages of an experiment to farm seaweed for biofuel in the Pacific Ocean. Kelp can grow two to three feet a day without fertilizer, pesticides, fresh water, or arable land — making it an ideal product for the biofuel industry.

The big splash on Alaska tideland? Kelp farming.

Applicants are asking Alaska's Department of Natural Resources for permission to begin hundreds of acres of kelp farming on the state's tidelands, reports Alaska Public Media. Last year, the state got requests to lease around 18 acres for various types of mariculture; this year, kelp farming would occupy two-thirds of the 1,000 acres of lease requests.

To reduce antibiotic use, feed your sows some seaweed

Researchers at University College in Dublin, Ireland say that feeding seaweed, a popular ingredient in ancient Chinese medicine, to sows can improve the health of their offspring and reduce the use of antimicrobials, says the Aberdeen (Scotland) Press and Journal.

‘The scale of ocean warming is staggering,’ IUCN report states

The effects of ocean warming are already being felt on crop yields and fishing stocks, according to the most comprehensive report yet on the topic, released by the International Union for Conservation of Nature at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawaii.

In South America, seaweed is the new kale

Wild seaweed is becoming an increasingly popular food source and moneymaker across South America, says Take Part. Most of the region’s seaweed is gathered from the wild, rather than cultivated as it is other parts of the world, like Asia. Of Chile’s 30,000 wild harvesters, most are women.

For the U.S. palate, bacon-flavored seaweed

The next kale could be an edible seaweed called dulse "that is highly nutritious and, when cooked, has a savory flavor that some describe as tasting like bacon," says the Salem Statesman Journal.

The next big protein on your plate may be seaweed

"Could the next big thing in alternative proteins be a something tiny and green?" asks NPR. "Several companies see a bright future for plant protein, and for microalgae in particular."