Asian wheat buyers aren’t phased by U.S. discovery of rogue GMO wheat

Unlike earlier incidents, Asian customers for wheat grown in the U.S. Northwest did not bat an eye at the USDA announcement that GMO wheat was found growing in the wild in Washignton state. "At this point there is no trade disruption and we do not expect any," said U.S. Wheat Associates, the export promotion arm of the wheat industry, on Monday.

‘Golden rice’ advances in Philippines, hits pothole in India

Philippines officials are considering a request for a biosafety permit for so-called golden rice, which would allow use of the vitamin A-enriched GMO rice as food or feed and for processing, says the Cornell Alliance for Science. The biosafety permit would allow researchers to conduct human nutrition studies, the alliance said during the summer, and an application to allow cultivation of the rice in the Philippines "will be submitted in the future."

Researchers find stem-rust resistant gene for wheat

Researchers at the University of California, Davis, have discovered a gene that creates resistance to stem-rust — a fungus that threatens wheat crops in Africa and Asia and food security worldwide.

Americans have it easy on meat prices, says global survey

Meat is significantly more affordable in America than it is in Europe, where prices are, on average, twice as high, and Asia, where many people can barely afford to buy it at all, says the 2017 meat-price index, released by Caterwings, a UK-based business-to-business catering service.

Ag groups press for U.S. trade deals with Japan, Asia-Pacific region

With Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe to meet President Trump on Friday, the two largest U.S. livestock groups suggested the president "initiate free-trade agreement negotiations with nations in the Asia-Pacific region beginning with Japan." Separately, 87 farm and trade groups and agribusinesses wrote Trump in support of expanded access to Asia-Pacific markets, the region involved in the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Bird-flu epidemics in Asia and Europe

Farmers in Asia and Europe have destroyed millions of birds as they combat epidemics of avian influenza, says the Wall Street Journal. The United States lost 10 percent of its egg-laying hens in its worst-ever outbreak of bird flu in 2014-15 but this time, U.S. egg producers are enjoying higher prices as they ship eggs to South Korea.

Experts say women farmers key to reducing global hunger

Hunger experts at an FAO meeting in Rome said that if women farmers had the same access as men to land, tools, and credit, crop yields would rise by at least a third and there would be 150 million fewer hungry people in the world, Reuters reports.

Millions work under forced labor in the food chain, says report

The UN International Labor Organization estimates 3.5 million people around the world work in forced labor conditions in agriculture, including forestry and fishing, says Civil Eats in a story on slavery in the food chain. "This means that forced labor has played a role in the supply chains of many of the most popular food and drinks."

Forget what you heard: aquaculture isn’t evil

Aquaculture is a vital source of food for much of the developing world, not the evil stepchild of wild caught fish, said a panel of experts at the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Sustainable Food Institute in Monterey, Calif.

Report: extreme hunger fell by half worldwide between 1990 and 2015

"Extreme poverty, child mortality, and hunger all fell by around half between 1990 and 2015," thanks to the Millennium Development Goals set by the United Nations in 2000, says the International Food Policy Research Institute in its 2016 Global Food Policy Report.