A Brooklyn co-op hustles as food demand spikes

Like other grocery stores in New York City, the Park Slope Food Co-op, in Brooklyn, is out of hand sanitizer. But even with 17,000 members and weekly sales of $1.23 million, shelves at one of the nation’s oldest and largest food co-ops are nearly full. “We got the hang of it very quickly after the initial enormous jolt of extra purchases hit 15 days ago,” Joe Holtz, the co-op’s general manager and co-founder, said late last week. (No paywall)

Big dairy ‘co-op’ illustrates what’s wrong with modern agricultural co-ops

Dairy Farmers of America, the 20-year-old product of the largest merger in dairy cooperative history, has become a vertically integrated “corporation” that enjoys the legal benefits of a cooperative while increasingly serving its own bottom line rather than its member farmers, says Washington Monthly.

Farmers markets, food co-ops build sense of community

Americans shop at farmers markets and join food cooperatives because they enjoy knowing who grows their food and because the commitment to local food makes them feel part of a community pursuing a healthy lifestyle and a sustainable environment, according to a U-Iowa study.