Wet fields mean corn planting will run late

A larger-than-usual portion of the U.S. corn crop will be planted so late that yields could be depressed, said two University of Illinois economists on Thursday. “A reasonable estimate is that late corn planting in 2019 will be at least 5 to 10 percent above average.”

U.S. crop production unlikely to suffer much from floods

Spring flooding in the northern Plains and western Corn Belt will have a marginal impact on corn and soybean plantings, according to a USDA survey of growers and initial tallies of flooded land. With normal weather and yields, there would be limited impact on production of the two most widely grown U.S. crops, thanks to the huge amount of cropland nationwide.

U.S. cropland values flat for fourth year

With a nationwide average of $4,130 an acre this year, the value of U.S. cropland is nearly unchanged from the 2014 average of $4,100 an acre, according to an annual USDA survey of producers.

The dominant request bankers hear from farmers: An operating loan

Farm lending has stabilized in the face of low agricultural profit margins, says a quarterly Federal Reserve report on ag banks. Operating loans, to pay day-to-day expenses, have accounted for nearly 60 percent of non-real-estate loans for the past year, "the highest in the 40 year survey history," says the report of conditions nationwide.

Corn growers say yes to revenue guarantees, no to yield protection

Given the choice, Corn Belt farmers vastly prefer revenue guarantees for their crop, whether through crop insurance or farm subsidies, over coverage that is based on yields, says economist Gary Schnitkey of the University of Illinois. The research shows why proposals to revamp the federally subsidized crop insurance program typically bog down in Congress.

New SDSU degree fills void in precision-ag education

South Dakota State University will launch the nation's first four-year degree in precision agriculture this fall, with a goal of educating "the next generation of innovators," reports AgWeb

Crop-insurance claims zoom for prevented planting

Crop-insurance claims by farmers for prevented planting are up by 48 percent this year, said Bloomberg, a reflection of the cold and rainy spring. Growers filed claims on 2.3 million acres of corn and nearly 2.2 million acres of soybeans, said the news agency, based on its review of federal data.

Soybean crop expected to take a hit from rainy spring

A rainy spring that delayed planting in the western Corn Belt will mean a smaller-than-expected soybean crop, traders said ahead of today's Crop Production report, which makes the first forecast of the fall harvest.

Cropland values sink in Corn Belt, rise in Southern Plains

Cropland in the Corn Belt is worth an average $6,840 an acre, down 2.3 percent from last year, according to the USDA's annual Land Values report.

As crop income falls, farmers borrow more operating money

Farmers in the Midwest and Plains - the major regions for corn, wheat and soybean production - are borrowing money to pay short-term operating expenses because shrinking crop income makes it harder to pay cash, according to a survey of ag bankers.