Food access in D.C.: Q&A with Ashanté Reese

In her new book, “Black Food Geographies: Race, Self-Reliance, and Food Access in Washington, D.C.,” Ashanté M. Reese, an assistant professor of anthropology at Spelman College, uses Deanwood, a predominately black neighborhood in D.C., as a lens to examine the broader obstacles to food access and opportunity facing black communities as well as how a narrative of self-reliance has both boosted and hindered fundamental changes in the food system.(No paywall)

D.C. proposes city-wide composting

The District of Columbia is following cities like New York and San Francisco in moving toward curb-side pickup of waste for composting, saying about "148,000 tons of organic waste could be composted annually — about 60 percent of the food and yard waste generated in the city each year," the Washington Post reported.